Movies I Liked Better Than the Book (& Other Confessions)

Hi, my name is Deborah O’Carroll, I’m a bookworm, and I’m here to talk about… movies.

Let’s face it: I’m a bookwyrm. (Wyrm here implying dragon, not earthworm/caterpillar/other creepy-crawly, thanks very much.) And Bookwyrms have a reputation for being strongly biased in favor of the book version as opposed to the movie version of many stories. This is almost always true of me, anyway. πŸ˜‰

But there are a few cases where I liked the movie even more (*shock*), or where I actually saw the movie FIRST (*gasp*), or where I have seen the movie and still haven’t read the book. (*more gasps* *cue bookworms in the back row fainting and having to be revived with smelling salts which smell suspiciously like books*)

This is by no means an exhaustive list, since, unlike with BOOKS, I do not keep lists of all the movies I’ve watched, with star-ratings, and whether they’re based on books, etc. So cataloguing every instance of the following categories would be exhausting — and if I’m going to be honest, I’d way rather go reorganize my bookshelves again and weep over my lack of shelf space these days.

ANYWAY.

Welcome to Bookworm Confessions: Movie Edition. (Including other categories because I don’t actually have all that many movies I liked more. XD)


Movies I Liked Even More Than the Books They Were Based On

Disclaimer: This isn’t to say I disliked the book versions — far from it, in some cases — I’m only saying that the movies were even better… in my opinion.

The Princess Bride

It’s just a fun movie! I haven’t seen it in ages and need to re-watch it, and it’s cheesy, but… eh… I don’t care! It’s just so epic and swashbuckling and original and funny! πŸ˜€ The book is fun too, but the movie just improved on it, IMO. Basically, it’s CLASSIC and I love it.

Treasure Island

THIS MOVIE! I like the Treasure Island book, but this is just the perfect movie version of it! Young Christian Bale as Jim Hawkins and Charlton Heston as Long John Silver are both perfect, the music by the Chieftains is AMAZING and just… I feel like the changes they made only made it better (like Jim’s mom, and less people dying. XD). It’s a little bloody because swashbuckling pirate movie, but I just really like it. πŸ™‚

The Muppet Christmas Carol

IT’S SO ADORABLE. The original Christmas Carol story is fine, but the Muppet version just makes it so FUN, and I don’t even like musicals usually (don’t throw things, please) but there’s a couple songs in this I love. And Michael Caine as Scrooge is just fantastic — plus there’s Nephew Fred and he had so much character. XD Anyway, it’s sheer fun but also has the spirit of the book’s message down just right. I just like it a lot. πŸ™‚

The Willows in Winter

I don’t know if anybody’s even HEARD of this, but it’s a sequel thing to The Wind in the Willows, and since it was animated the same, with the same voices, as a Wind in the Willows movie I watched growing up, I just loved it as a direct sequel and felt like it fit together really well. XD When I read the book it was based on, the book was all right, but it just didn’t have quite the heart that the movie version did, somehow? I felt like the movie made sense of it and made it fit with the original better. But it might just be because it went with the version I liked to watch. πŸ˜› Anyway, it’s a fun movie.


Movies I Saw Before Reading the Book

The Secret of Moonacre (movie) / The Little White Horse (book)

So, I didn’t know these were the same thing until I looked it up one time and went “whaaat?” But at the same time, kudos to them for changing the title since they changed everything ELSE about the story too. XD I saw the movie first, so I found it to be quite fun. And then I read the book and it was one of THE most gorgeous books I’d ever read. So I’m sure if I’d read the book first, I’d have been horrified at what the movie was like, but as it is, I ended up enjoying both, even if the book was better. πŸ˜‰

Sense and Sensibility

Actually, I saw two different S&S versions before reading the book… but I still liked the book best. XD This one was better than the other one I saw, though. Colonel Brandon! (Edward Ferrars is best as his book self. πŸ˜‰ But I loved him playing with Margaret, and that she was even IN it — which the other movie I saw was lacking in. They just cut her character out?? Like… rude?)

Emma

Saw this one before reading the book, but, again, I still liked the book (especially Mr. Knightley!) much better, even though this one was fun. And before you ask, I’ve since seen two more Emma movies (after reading the book) and my fave might be Gwyneth Paltrow’s just because it’s so fun. XD But the book is still my favorite. None of the films do Mr. Knightley justice, IMO. And that’s a shame, because he’s so fabulous!

Mansfield Park

I actually hardly remembered this one when I read the book since it had been so long since watching… So I don’t even know if this counts. Ha! Anyway, I don’t remember this much but I don’t particularly love either the book or the movie. XD

The Princess Bride & The Muppet Christmas Carol & The Willows in Winter

Which may partially account for my liking them better as movies… since I saw them before reading their book versions. AHEM. (Nothing to see here, folks, just toootally coincidental, I’m sure. *cough*)


Movies I’ve Seen and Haven’t Read the Book Yet (But Intend To)

Captain Blood

I love this movie and totally need to read the book! It’s been sitting on my shelf waiting patiently. πŸ˜€ I know it won’t be… well… Errol Flynn, but I imagine I’ll enjoy the book all the same!

Eragon

I’ll probably read this sooomeday… I just haven’t felt like it/gotten around to it. I hear the movie is way more original than the book, even if it’s cheesy. XD But I do find the movie to be kind of fun, in a slightly ridiculous way. And of course I like Murtagh, so there’s that… πŸ˜›

Tuck Everlasting

I actually got the movie and the book at the same time at a library sale and was going to read the book first… but then I caved and just watched it. πŸ˜› It’s kind of fun though I can’t always decide how I feel about it. XD But sometime I’m going to just sit down and read the book because it’s tiny. I just… haven’t yet.

Β Alex Rider: Operation Stormbreaker (movie) / Stormbreaker (book)

(I find it vaguely hilarious that when I was searching for images of this book/movie, I kept getting Thor’s new hammer-axe thing. XD)

I randomly watched this movie and it was fun, if cheesy. I have the book and I’ve actually started it since, but haven’t finished because review books and deadlines. But it looks like it might be kind of similar to the movie… Not sure. But the movie had Ewan McGregor as Alex’s uncle, which was so cool. πŸ˜€ And Alex’s character looks kind of like a younger version of my character Adrian, which is also fun. XD


Movies I’ve Seen and Don’t Necessarily Plan To Read the Book

(but I might)

The Hunger Games / Catching Fire / Mockingjay

Dystopian is not my thing so I don’t know if I’ll get around to reading these. But I DID see the movies and enjoyed them in their own scary-movie kind of way. XD Just don’t get me started on annoying things about the last one. *cough* But who knows, I might surprise myself, and everyone, and read these sometime… Or at least the first couple. But maybe not.

Divergent / Insurgent / Allegiant

These were also surprisingly neat/interesting, particularly the first one (I think? I watched them all together so I hardly remember which is which except it gets progressively tiring the more Peter switches sides…). I also might end up reading these sometime (partly because I have a copy of the short stories about Four around, which I’m curious about) but, again, Dystopia… not my thing… and all that. So I don’t really feel like I need to.

How to Train Your Dragon

I don’t know if this actually counts, given how different the books/movies are. XD But from what I can tell, the books don’t really look like my thing and I just don’t think I’ll get around to reading them, which is fine with me. I love me these movies, though. ^_^


Movies I Actually Love Both the Book and the Movie

(even though, of course, the book is always better. ;))

Because sometimes, despite all odds, even if it’s not much like the book, I still like these movies. XD

This will not be an extensive list, but a few are:

The Lord of the Rings

The Lord of the Rings movies are just so epic, okay? I can’t help it. I love them. Even if they do wreck a few things along the way, which we just… won’t talk about right now. (*cough*Faramir*cough*) They’re just so gorgeous! ❀ The books are still way my favorite, but I can’t help loving these too.

(We just won’t talk about the Hobbit movies right now. *another coughing fit*)

Kidnapped (1995)

AAHH, this movie! It’s just delightful and Scottish and yes. Alan Breck Stewart is totally different in the book/movie, but I actually love both versions of him. XD And the MUSIC and bits of story they stole, ish, from the sequel, and… I just like it a lot.

Howl’s Moving Castle

Just because it’s so adorable, okay? I don’t know howww it works that I love the book so much and then the movie is TOTALLY different and I love that too, but… just don’t question it. I think they’re SO different that I can keep them separate in my mind AND IT’S JUST PRECIOUS HALP. (I do find it hilarious how movie-Howl and movie-Sophie etc. are so NICE and in the book they’re so… not. XD) I love the book way more, though, because the book version is amazing. πŸ˜‰

Jeeves and Wooster

I don’t know what this is doing here but I was thinking of Bertie and Jeeves the other day and how I love the books but the show is really fun too. XD Like… they’re really rather different but, I don’t know, still super fun. πŸ˜€

Anything Sherlock Holmes

I LIKE ALL THE HOLMES THINGS, OKAY? I think the book version is still my favorite — he just has so much going and is awesome — but I just enjoy all the movie versions anyway. XD They all seem to bring out different sides of him (although I’m pretty sure people tend to forget that the REAL Holmes from the books was also a gentleman… *cough*) and while the book is the definitive version for me, the adaptions are just way too much fun. So. Yes. Give me all the Sherlock Holmes.


I know that as soon as I post this I’ll think of important movies/books that should be on this list, but OH WELL. It’s just a few, dontcha know. πŸ˜›

If there’s interest, I may do a sequel post about books I wish would be made into movies. (*gasp* The shock!)

If you want to read another Bookwyrm Confessions post, you can check out this one:

Talk to me!

So how about you, fellow bookwyrmish friends? I want to hear what you think! Have you seen/liked any of these? Is it indeed terrible to see the movie first?? (Have you disowned me yet?) And do you have any book/movie confessions to share? Let me know below in the comments! πŸ˜€ Thanks for reading! ^_^

Frustrated Rants of a Victim of Self Publishing

frustratedrants

Perhaps I should clarify: this is not about self-publishing per se. And it is not intended to bash any author or any book. This is more about what I call republishing: the power that self-published authors have to tweak or rewrite their own books after “publication” (especially e-books); how this power impacts readers, and whether this is good or not.

I don’t have answers. This is just a rant about some problems I have seen or experienced. Proceed at your own risk. Thank you.


“Publishing” doesn’t seem to have the same meaning anymore. A published book used to be fairly final. Maybe there would be some typos fixed in later printings, or perhaps a second edition or whatever. But it was more of a complicated process, involving lots of people, and therefore used somewhat sparingly.

With self-publishing, particularly with e-books, the author can change the book any time they want, and in any way. Which makes it easier for fixing typos, of course (huzzah!).

But what about more than that?

It seems to this reader that many self-published books this reader has run into, were published by a youngish author (not even necessarily young; maybe just less experienced) awhile ago… and even could have been a very good book… and then the author decides they’ve improved as a writer and decide to majorly tweak or rewrite said “published” book.

This is what I call republishing, and I am a victim of it.

I’m not naming names or titles. There’s doubtless always a reason for such things being done, and often I even agree with them. This is not for any person(s) or book(s) in particular. I’m not bashing anyone! Anyone who may have done this… I still love them. This is just an accumulation in my mind that requires this reader to rant.

So rant I shall.

What if you’ve bought the old version…

…and haven’t read it?

If I’ve bought a book and haven’t read it yet, and then hear it’s being rewritten, or has been, since I bought it… well, that makes me not want to read the version I own. Why should I bother? It’s an old version. It’s no longer current. It does make me feel rather depressed — I bought this book, but it’s no longer a “real” book so I’m not going to read it… or if I do, I’ll know it’s not “real” any longer. And if I’m not going to read this version, that I bought, why should I bother buying and reading the new version? It rather puts me off the whole idea, which is a sadness indeed. Especially when I really wanted to read that book!

If someone sends me a copy of their unpublished work-in-progress to beta-read, and I’m busy and don’t get around to it right away, and then they send me an updated version before I’ve read the first… am I going to read the first version or the new one? The new one, of course.

It’s like that, except that it’s unpublished and is expected to change.

A published book is supposed to be finished, right?

Right?

What if you’ve bought the old version

…and HAVE read it?

Oftentimes it seems that authors who do this republishing are very aware of what they’re doing, and very kindly put their republished book up for free for a time, so that buyers of the previous version (read, or unread) can have the new version and won’t be victims. This is very considerate of them, and I appreciate the sentiment. Maybe it works for most people.

I for one have never managed to make this work. Allegedly you can delete your version on your kindle or kindle app, and re-order the book from amazon, and it should be the new version. For me, that’s never worked. It always keeps the original version, no matter what I do. Again, this may just be me.

But, along that line…

What if it does work?

What if the e-book of the old version is whisked magically (scientifically; whatever) away into the nether-ness of deleted data, and replaced with a shiny, new, updated version just as the author wishes it to be.

What if you have the new version, but…

What if you liked the older version better?

This has happened to me. I’ve read books that the author has later rewritten or changed now that they’re a better writer… and I have infinitely preferred the previous version. Fortunately, the particular one I’m thinking about, the old was a physical copy, and the new version an e-book. So I could compare the changes, read both versions, and realize that I preferred the old… and still had it so I can still read that version. Happy day!

But. If I had preferred the old version, and it had been a replaced e-book (if it had worked), then the version I liked better would have been gone.

Forever.

Something about that idea makes this book-loving reader’s heart bleed and this reader’s word-devouring eyes cry.

(It also reminds me of, in Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke, how Mr. Norrell made all the copies of Mr. Strange’s book on magic disappear, because he didn’t like Strange’s take on things. Granted, that’s someone else getting rid of it, which is not quite the same as the author doing so. But still.)

True, it would be the version the author liked better.

But what of the reader?

Isn’t the reader important too?

Aren’t books for readers?

Who is right: the author, or the reader?

Well, I believe both are right. That’s why things get complicated. (This could easily trail off into a discussion of Tolkien and the Tree of Tales… but that’s a ginormous topic for another day.)

But if I read a book and love it and recommend it to everyone… and then the author changes it… how will I know if it’s still the book I recommended? What if it isn’t? How can I recommend it? What if I want to recommend the old version but it’s not available anymore?

As I said, when beta-reading an unpublished manuscript, you know it’s not the final product and will change. Sometimes I prefer an earlier version to the final one, personal reader preference versus author-decision; author has the final word, which is as it should be since it’s their story. But at least, then, I know it’s subject to change. It’s not finished. It’s not finalized. It’s not PUBLISHED.

Now, it seems that “published” doesn’t necessarily mean anything anymore.

Self-published books seem to just mean it’s available for people to read.

But it’s not safe. It could change at any time.

From a reader’s point of view, this is frightening.

From an author’s?

Well, from an author’s point of view, it’s wonderful. You (this is a generic “you”. It doesn’t mean you who are reading this or anyone in particular) can publish your book, people can read it, everything can be great… Then if you decide that you’ve grown as a writer and hate your old version or think it needs a lot of tweaking, if you’re self-published and especially with e-books, you can just go in and fix it — easy-peasy — and feel that all’s right with the world and whoever buys it from now on (and whoever successfully downloads the copy you put available for free for awhile) will have the new, the updated, the REAL version that’s the version you like.

. . . For now.

Until you decide to change it again.

Published doesn’t apparently mean “finished” anymore.

Am I judging anyone?

Heck no.

If I had anything published and — horror of horrors — found a typo, I’d go right in and change it.

If I had self-published my first finished novel back when I was thinking about publishing it, I’d be in the exact same boat as all these republishers. I look back at that fourteen-or-however-old-I-was writing and I cringe and am very glad that I was not prevailed upon (as the pressure was) to publish right away, back when I felt like it was “ready”. (Ha.) Otherwise I would be rushing right in to republish an updated, rewritten version. Probably multiple times. Especially since my first finished book is now in the middle of a series, and will require massive rewrites and perhaps a complete overhaul by the time I get the other books written.

Which brings us to another aspect of this discussion…

Continuity in series

I will admit that Tolkien himself ended up changing part of a chapter of The Hobbit, after its publication, before The Lord of the Rings was published. Without it, maybe The Lord of the Rings wouldn’t have made sense. *shrug* Or maybe it would. But it was a fairly big deal and he even went to lengths to make the change fit in within the story-world itself (i.e., the old version was the version Bilbo wrote in his book, since The Hobbit was his memoir, and it was different than what truly happened and was published later, because the Ring was already working on him and he didn’t want to tell the whole story about getting it, and Gollum, and everything).

How about the Redwall books by Brian Jacques. The first book, Redwall, was published almost without the author’s knowledge; he had just written it to amuse the blind children at the school he delivered milk to, and had no real plans to publish it, but somebody just basically did. Huzzah! Consequently, when he began to write more stories there were a lot of continuity errors between Redwall and the later (and earlier) books, and also between them as he was writing them. Did he go back and rewrite/edit them to fit together better? No, he did not. Do readers sometimes complain about this? Yes, they do. But I for one am glad of it (the not-changing; not the complainers). They may not make entire sense all together, but they’d be different if they did, and I like them how they are, and I’m much happier that he went on to write many other delightful Redwall adventures instead of mucking about trying to make the published ones all seamlessly fit together.

Authors are human. There are errors, especially in huge series. And that’s okay.

Also, I can’t let a discussion of republishing end without mentioning the republished versions of Nancy Drew and The Hardy Boys series. The original versions (Hardy Boys books started in 1927, Nancy Drew in 1930) were “modernized” in the ’50s and ’80s and also since then, and basically entirely rewritten AND PUBLISHED AGAIN UNDER THE SAME TITLES. What even is this nonsense.

Now, I positively loved the original Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys stories (though the Rick Brant books were my favorites of those kind of old series. SCOTTY. <3). They’re so much fun and just… yes. Awesome. But the newer ones, edited to be more “socially acceptable” or some rubbish, are ick. Like, the original characters were awesome and noble and heroic and fun. The old books are wonderful and the new ones are awful and TOTALLY different. And yet they’re hailed as the real versions these days because the old ones are old and rare and… the new ones are masquerading as the old ones and pretending to be the actual books but they’re NOT. This really bothers me…

So there is a case of a “real” publisher republishing things… It’s not just self-publishers, I know… But any version of this can be annoying is all I’m saying.

Also on that note… Abridged. JUST… NO. I do not like books being abridged! It feels just… so so wrong. -_-

My rant is trailing off down several rabbit trails, as rants are wont to do…

I can see the point of editing a book so that it will make sense with the later books in the series, or editing it because otherwise there can be no sequels at all because the story doesn’t fit.

But that doesn’t mean, as a reader, that I have to like it.

And maybe the first book should have waited to be published until the later ones were finished if continuity is that big of a concern.

Yes, I suppose it’s somewhat cool that anyone can publish their own book; freedom and all that.

I can see a certain benefit to being able to go back and redo a book one wrote as a teen, or even as a generally younger person who was not yet as advanced of a writer as one currently is.

But maybe one shouldn’t have published it yet if it wasn’t ready.

William Goldman said that The Princess Bride and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (movie) were the only things he wrote that he can look back on without humiliation, because he dislikes his own writing. But he didn’t go back and try to fix them.

All writers grow as they continue writing.

And as long as their work(s) is unpublished, they should feel free to write and rewrite and tweak to their heart’s content. But it’s quite possible that once it’s published it should be finished and done with and largely unchanged, aside from minor things like typos (yes, my perfectionist self will make allowances for that) and, yes, there can be a second edition or maybe a tweaked this or that… Traditionally published books do seem to sometimes do things like that. But it’s purposefully slow and difficult.

Because published books are supposed to be basically finished.

That’s why they’re published and not still manuscripts.

Conclusion

Ignore this post or disagree with it or argue with it or hate it as you will.

I don’t have answers.

I’m not pretending to.

This is a rant of a confused victim of self-publishing and consequently republishing, who no longer knows what to think.

I’m torn because, as a writer myself, I see the author’s point of view, and I know if it came right down to it and I was published (fortunately, I am not) I would probably be doing the same thing, and be glad about it.

But as I said, I’m torn. Because as a reader, I want my books to be just that. Books. Not ever-changing manuscripts. I want BOOKS.

I may never be an author.

I’ve been a writer for a long time and hope to be for even longer, as long as I have stories to write down.

But I’ve always been and hopefully always will be a reader.

And with so many writers and self-publishers in the world today (this can be both good and bad; again, I don’t have answers) I feel like it’s time that a reader’s opinion is heard.

This reader had something to say, decided to embrace free speech, whether or not it was a good idea, and has now said it.

Do with it what ye will.

fin

Unpopular Opinions Tag

So, you know how I said I had one tag left? Well back up, I have an amendment to that statement. Why, you ask?

Because Cait @ Paper Fury just tagged me with the bookish Unpopular Opinions Tag! Which kind of makes my day/week. Thanks Cait!!

So, I am going to do that! (Which will nicely carry my final [?] tag-post to my normal posting day of Monday. I like tidiness, I do.)

At first I was thinking of not doing it, because I’m not naturally a negative person. But I decided to give myself license to rant a liiittle bit today. For therapeutic reasons, you understand. πŸ˜‰ I hope I won’t offend/annoy anyone. o.o But… well… these are kinda my opinions and as Cait so wisely said, we can all have differing opinions on small bookish things and still be friends! (Mostly. Hopefully. I have learned such things the hard way. :P)

So. Let’s do this thing!

(Pictures from Pinterest and Goodreads. Yes I did just raid my entire store of gifs on Pinterest why do you ask… Gifs make everything better and are stupendous at lightening moods. *nod nod*)

The Unpopular Opinions Tag of a Bookish Variety

1. A POPULAR BOOK OR SERIES YOU DIDN’T LIKE.

Um… I’m not sure if they count as popular, but I’m going to pick two books for this.

knightlyunfortunate

The End, the last book in A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket — which I just hated how it ended and it didn’t explain ANYTHING and just gaahh. I kept reading the whole series, partly because they were amusing (in a dark way) and partly to find out what happened. BUT IT DIDN’T TELL US.

And Knightly Academy by Violet Haberdasher, because it had such potential to be awesome (I mean, a boy goes to school to become a knight in an alternate Victorian England? Sounds awesome, right?) but just UGH it let me down. I guess it’s just how all schools are with the bullies and the pointlessness and stuff. But I couldn’t see WHY the hero wanted to go to that school and he was so trod upon and it was sad and so annoying.

(Or… more like angry. But the gun shooting is accurate so…)

2. A POPULAR BOOK/SERIES EVERYONE HATES BUT YOU LOVE.

Again, don’t know if they count as popular, but…

houndillusionarium

The Princess and the Hound by Mette Ivie Harrison. I just loved it but nobody else seems to! What? PRINCE GEORGE, OKAY. He’s the best. And the story did enough twists and turns to make me rearrange my brain and just it was kind of amazing.

Also maybe Illusionarium by Heather Dixon, which might not count because it just came out but people seem to complain about it and I’m just sitting here going EXCUSE ME?? Aside from it being too creepy for me, it was SPECTACULAR. How can people complain that it’s… um… boring??

3. A LOVE TRIANGLE WHERE THE PROTAGONIST ENDED UP WITH THE PERSON YOU DIDN’T WANT THEM TO BE WITH.

(Is it bad the first thing in my mind at this question was a confused notion of Hawkeye? But he’s not a book character and I think I’m okay with it but I don’t know…)

halflings

I don’t know if I can think of one… I guess I don’t read much love-triangle stuff? But how about Halflings by Heather Burch — that has a love triangle and I kind of like both of the guys but Raven is kind of awesomer than Mace, so. And then I’ve HEARD suspicious things about Maria and Quinn and someone else later in the Destiny trilogy by Sarah Holman… so I’ll have to see. Ahem. I’ve only read the first in each series (I actually really liked The Destiny of One) so actually have no idea and am totally unqualified! But still.

destinyBut yeah. Love triangles in general… A mess.

4. POPULAR GENRE YOU HARDLY READ.

dystopian

Dystopian! Just… no. -_- I DO NOT LIKE IT. I’ve read, like… three? The genre makes me shrivel inside and is thoroughly unpleasant and just it gives me this awful feeling and depresses me. No thank you. THEY ARE JUST SO… HOPELESS OKAY. Like, the evil people have everything and are rich and the good people live in the dirt literally and are oppressed and everybody’s grumpy and everyone dies and sure mayyybe eventually the good guys will win (maybe?) but who even cares by now? Life just doesn’t sound worth living. Blech. I don’t have anything much specifically against the ones I have read, I mean, they’re fairly good and all (Captives by Jill Williamson, and Swipe and Sneak by Evan Angler… and yes I will read the Swipe sequels because PECK. PECK PECK. Though I just remembered some others I’ve read and no). On the whole I’m just not a fan of dystopian and will only read them when forced. NO THANK YOU.

5. A POPULAR/BELOVED CHARACTER YOU DISLIKE.

Marianne Dashwood from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen. I’m sorry, people, but I cannot abide characters who pine away and make themselves ill for love, especially for love of someone who’s a complete jerk, especially when there’s a really nice guy in plain sight, especially when all she’s doing is being a burden to her sister and mom and basically being worthless and it’s just stupid stupid stupid. I’M SORRY OKAY but I just can’t understand why anyone likes Marianne Dashwood. To me, she was just extremely unlikeable. I’m sure everyone else is seeing something I can’t and I’m just sitting here trying to figure it out…

mdashwood

6. A POPULAR AUTHOR YOU CAN’T SEEM TO GET INTO.

Suzanne Collins? I haven’t read the HG books yet but I read Gregor the Overlander years ago before HG was even a THING and I just… couldn’t get into it. Or Orson Scott Card with anything other than Ender’s Game and Ender’s Shadow.

7. A POPULAR TROPE YOU’RE TIRED OF READING.

The tough girls. Maybe this is extreme, but I’m very very sick of the so called tough heroines who think they’re so awesome (but are in reality even whinier than their more timid counterparts) and are all “I can be one of the guys and awesomer than they are and yeah I’m so tough.” I’m sooo tired of those. Ladies, you can use weapons and stuff — that is awesome, I have no problem with it, go you — and fine you can wear trousers if it’s more practical (though usually it’s more to make a statement) but can we please have enough of this attitude and making a big deal of everything? SERIOUSLY. -_-

shoojack

8. A POPULAR SERIES YOU HAVE NO INTEREST IN READING.

Um… Twilight? Though I almost want to read it just to see what everyone’s deal is with hating it so bad. πŸ˜› Almost. Recently I would also have answered this with Harry Potter and the Hunger Games trilogy. I guess they would fit under the question actually because “no interest in reading” which is rather true of me, but maybe someday I might end up reading them anyway just to see what on earth is up with them, peoples. Y’know, some decade when I actually have time and if they ever actually take priority over books that I’m excited about and WANT to read… Ha.

(Yeah, that’s funny…)

9. A SHOW/MOVIE ADAPTION YOU LIKED BETTER THAN THE BOOK.

The Princess Bride, and the 1990 Treasure Island with Christian Bale and Charlton Heston. OKAY I SAID IT. There are a couple movies I like more than the books. But this is really extreme. πŸ˜› I do love both the books too though! But the movies were just… aaahh, so awesome! Of course the screenplay of The Princess Bride was done by the author, which is cool. I as-you-wish The Princess Bride. ❀

And Treasure Island, especially with its epic music by The Chieftains and just I loved all the casting and whatever changes they made I mostly liked and it was just awesome. And Charlton Heston as Long John Silver was awesome and Christian Bale as Jim Hawkins was perfection, and I kind of really loved Captain Smollet for some reason. It may have been his hair, or accent…? Anyways nobody really knows about it because I think it was a TV movie, and maybe it’s a bit violent but I kind of just loved it.

10. A POPULAR STYLE OF COVER YOU CAN’T STAND. (Cait’s addition to the tag)

I’m… not much of a cover connoisseur I’m afraid, other than unashamedly loving gorgeous dresses on covers… But it kind of annoys me when part of a face is missing… And mostly I think minimalistic sort of covers, popularized by The Hunger Games methinks, are super annoying. Like… a black background with some words and maybe some sort of icon thing. *shrug* It’s kind of boring I’m afraid. I wouldn’t say I “can’t stand” it but yeah. LET’S HAVE PEOPLE ON THE COVERS. DRESSES. WEAPONS. I DON’T KNOW — SOMETHING INTERESTING. Oh, and also, in general, covers that looked like they were made by a three-year-old. They make me sad.

***

There are no specific “rules” for this tag, so again I’m not tagging anyone — those who like stating their unpopular opinions are likely to take it anyway, and those who are more timid about it (like me…) might be torn about doing it.

So! Once again, if you would like to do this, play snag-the-tag! It’s a fun game, I assure you.

There is my post. I have now gotten my bookish negativity checked off my list for the next… hopefully year. πŸ˜›

What do you think? Agree? Disagree?
Have I done an unsafe thing by stating unpopular opinions?
WILL I BE SAFE AT NIGHT? O_O

(I guess we’ll find out… I keep a dragon under my bed as a burglar alarm. I do. His name is Flame the Frabjous and he’s very well trained against bilboes and other less harmless things that go bump in the night like frumious bookworms out armed with weapons of revenge that cause paper-cuts.)